Mediacrity – Column

November 1, 1995

Don’t you think that Quentin Tarantino might be just a mite too ubiquitous lately? Yes, dammit, I said it, and I’m glad. You hear me?

Angus Soundtrack – Review

November 1, 1995

It’s as if someone asked me what my favorite punk/pop/dumb rock bands were, chose a song apiece, and slapped ’em on a compilation.

UHF/VHF – Review

November 1, 1995

Disc one has 16 noise/ambient/experimental tracks, disc two has 21 of the most insanely heavy songs you’ll ever hear. Many are teasers to new records.

A Slice Of Lemon – Review

November 1, 1995

If you enjoyed the comps Kill Rock Stars, Stars Kill Rock, or Rock Stars Kill, then you’ll be into this double CD as well. There are 39 bands, one track each.

Mindrot – Dawning – Review

November 1, 1995

Mindrot trudges through the dreary swamps of ambient noise and eerie instrumentalization and roars battlecries while kicking some serious ass.

Menswear – Nuisance – Review

November 1, 1995

Menswear’s best moments recall Buzzcocks or early Jam. At their worst moments, it becomes apparent that Duran Duran and Spandau Ballet had an indelible effect.

Lone Wolves – “Leggo” – Review

November 1, 1995

This is garage schlock the way it was meant to be done. Snarling, demented, slightly perverted, trash rock ‘n’ roll. I’m glad I’ve gotten a chance to hear them.

Kreator – Cause for Conflict – Review

November 1, 1995

A terrifyingly powerful record, produced huger than anything in Kreator’s back catalog. The cover art isn’t like days of old, but it’s Kreator, so it’s great.

Battery – nV – Review

November 1, 1995

Memories of a more Gothic Black Sabbath, with statuesque, not comic book, morbidity. Battery have heart, but the album lacks the twists to keep it interesting.

Joe Satriani – Review

November 1, 1995

Filled with amazingly beautiful vocals and heartfelt lyrics that shine through despite the low-fi production. There are no guitar solos either.

In Flames – Subterranean – Review

November 1, 1995

Crystal clear and tight instrumentals, raw and crisp Helloween-esque singing guitars. Vocals are like early Kreator, Whiplash, or more recently, At the Gates.

Humble Gods – Review

November 1, 1995

They’re wild, break the rules, and love publicity stunts. They play raw, unfiltered punk rock with enough manic energy, hate, and humor to make ’em rock.

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